Bioeconomy Conference | Programm |  Programm 2019

Mon May 13 th 2019

  • OPENING

    Greetings

  • Prof. Dr. Ludger A. Wessjohann, ScienceCampus Halle - Plant-Based Bioeconomy (WCH) & Prof. Dr. Matthias Zscheile,BioEconomy Cluster

  • Prof. Dr. Jutta Schnitzer-Ungefug, Secretary-General of the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina – Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften

  • Dr. Jürgen Ude, State Secretary of the Ministry of Economy, Science and Digitalisation of the State Saxony-Anhalt

  • Opening Speech: Andrea Noske, Head of Division 726 - Sustainable Economy; Bio-Economy, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

  • SESSION 1 - SOCIAL-ECONOMIC ISSUES OF THE BIOECONOMY

    Chairman: Prof. Dr. Alfons Balmann, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), GER

  • mehr

    Biography

    Mareike Gast has been Professor of Industrial Design at Burg Giebichenstein since 2016 - with a focus on material- and technology-based product development. She has had her own office in Frankfurt am Main since 2010. Specializing in new materials and technologies, she works closely with industry and research to develop innovative and sustainable products and strategies. In addition to her work in teaching, product development and research, Mareike Gast regularly writes for various magazines and curates exhibitions on materials research. Mareike Gast was born in Hameln in 1979. She studied at the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design and graduated from the Design Academy Eindhoven in Industrial Design in 2005.

    Abstract

    Sustainability is becoming increasingly urgent and at the same time more complex. Ecological as well as social and economic connections and dependencies, needs and necessities are becoming more opaque, more difficult to understand and thus more difficult to design. At the same time, the diversity of biotechnological production possibilities is growing rapidly. The potentials and promises are great. Nevertheless, with them grows the fear of further alienation from nature. Where does this journey of biotechnology in the age of the Anthropozoan lead us? And more importantly, where do we want to steer it?
    Design has the wonderful ability to meet these issues with concrete visions that are indispensable for a critical, explorative and future-oriented debate.

    Prof. Mareike Gast (photography: Matthias Ritzmann)
  • Dr. Martin Banse,Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, GER

    Title: "Bioeconomy in Germany 2050: A transdisciplinary approach for scenario development"

    mehr

    Biography

    Martin Banse is Director at the Thünen Institute of Market Analysis Institute in Braunschweig, Germany. Martin Banse has over 20 years’ experience in quantitative analyses of agricultural policy and international trade. He has done much work in agricultural sector analysis and quantitative modelling, and has extensive experience in working with partial and general equilibrium models especially in the area of bioeconomy. He is coordinator of the project ‘Monitoring the German Bioeconomy’ funded by the Fachagentur für Nachwachsende Rohstoffe (FNR).

    Abstract

    This presentation builds on different narratives of a transition process of the German economy towards a more sustainable "Bioeconomy 2050". It explicitly covers societal acceptance of this transformation process. Based on this integrative approach, we develop viable paths for the transformation of a fossil-based economy into a bio-based economy, based on current agricultural and resource use, the availability of biomass (especially from agriculture and forestry), and its use. The increasing demand for bio-based resources will have socio-economic and environmental effects. Thus, potentials of the bioeconomy as well as possible limits and fields of conflict are made clear. Measures to mitigate these conflicts (e.g. by increasing yields and efficiency, cascade use, use of residual and waste materials) are presented and evaluated in terms of their social acceptance. Conflicts of objectives identified with the aid of model analyses are fed back to stakeholders and the population in a multi-stage process and solution strategies and options for action are identified.

    An important concern is the identification of (political) responsibilities, options for action and control elements. Based on this approach we will present a transdisciplinary approach that does not only provide an assessment of the impact of the current transition process but also identify how to develop a socially accepted transformation process towards a sustainable "Bioeconomy 2050" in Germany.

    Dr. Martin Banse (photography: private)
  • Christina Höfling, Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum, GER

    Title: "Shaping futures – from science to society"

    mehr

    Biography

    Following her master’s degree in biosciences at the WWU Münster in 2013, Christina Höfling started a two-year scientific traineeship in the education department of the Senckenberg Natural History Museum Frankfurt. Afterwards, she was involved in various projects, mainly focusing on the development of workshops and didactic materials for schools. Since 2017 she is responsible for the BMBF funded project BioKompass at the museum, supporting communication and participation of a bio-based future in society.

    Abstract

    The transition to a bio-based economy implicates fundamental alterations in every aspect of society. In addition to scientific and industrial innovations, the way to a sustainable fossil-free future highly depends on the societal will to change. Therefore, it is important to strengthen knowledge and understanding of bioeconomy in the general public in order to enable a discourse about how a bio-based future might look like. What are we going to eat for breakfast in the year 2040? Which clothes are we going to wear and how will we live? Which opportunities and risks do we face? Based on the development of different future scenarios of a bio-based daily life, the BMBF funded project BioKompass uses a variety of communicative and participatory formats to address the public. The museum serves as a bridge from science to society: a special exhibition shows the results of the project and invites visitors to share their opinions as well as ideas. It becomes a place of exchange and inspiration, empowering especially young people to actively shape the discussion about the future. The talk will give insights into this approach of public outreach and share first experiences.

    Christina Höfling (photography: Tränker/Senckenberg)
  • Coffee Break

  • SUBSESSION 1 – Model Region Central Germany

    Chairman: Prof. Dr. Alfons Balmann, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), GER

  • Prof. Dr. Daniela Thrän, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), GER

    Title: "Development of a framework for monitoring the bioeconomy"

    mehr

    Biography

    Prof. Dr.-Ing. Daniela Thrän (b. 1958) is the head of the department Bioenergy at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research GmbH (UFZ) since 2011. There she leads a multidisciplinary team of about 50 scientists focusing on areas of biomass potentials, bioenergy pathways and their assessment, bioeconomy material flows and sustainability assessment. Prof. Thrän is a member of the German Bioeconomy Council and the European Bioeconomy Stakeholders Pane

    Abstract

    Symobio is a research project within the concept “Bioeconomy as Societal Change” of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The project develops scientific basics for a systemic monitoring and modelling of the German bioeconomy (BE) with respect to sustainability aspects on a national and international level. One major part of this project is to establish the basis for a comprehensive framework for a systemic monitoring of the BE. Therefore, stakeholders were involved to address the different expectations and perspectives of industry, NGOs, GOs and science on a potentially sustainable BE. Furthermore, for the analysis we also included strategy papers and existing regulatory frameworks from Germany and Europe, as means to include a wider range of aspects and the dynamic development in the political goal discussion. With this approach we identified relevant objectives for the systemic BE monitoring as a learning system beyond the actual policy discussion. We also identified the interdependencies between these expectations and criteria and indicators of existing monitoring systems.

    Prof. Andrea Thrän (photography: André Künzelmann/UFZ)
  • Gabi Waldhof, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), GER

    Title: "Different Moralities hinder Consensus on Biotechnologies - Evidence from the German GMO-Debate"

    mehr

    Biography

    Gabi Waldhof is a PhD student at the Chair of Economic Ethics (Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg) and the Leibniz Institute IAMO, working on the WCH-funded project AgriMyths. Within this project, she identifies moral values that are relevant for GMO opposition as well as GMO support. In this context, she also examines which moral values of those addressed in the GMO debate may be crucial for public opinion formation. 

    Previous to starting her PhD, Gabi Waldhof worked as a research assistant at the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, and in the DFG priority programme “Experience and Expectation”.She holds a Double Master degree in “Economics” from UCL, London, and HSE, Moscow, and completed her Bachelor’s in “Philosophy & Economics” at the University of Bayreuth.

    Abstract

    Agricultural genetic engineering has been a controversial topic for long. Even more so, the public  discourse reached a complete blockade and consensus seems impossible. Generally, the scientific community concludes that emotions and intuitions are more relevant for GMO acceptance than additional information or rational cost-benefit calculations (e.g. Siegrist et al. 2013, Kahneman & Tversky 1982). Consequently, we attempt to identify moral values that underly the arguments of the debating parties. Using Haidt’s Moral Foundation Theory, we conduct an extensive text analysis of the German GMO-debate to analyse arguments of NGOs, scientists and companies with regard to addressed moral values. We find that opposing parties focus on differing moral values, and interprete aspects of genetic engineering very differently. Understanding the role of moral values in such debates helps to explain why public discourses sometimes fail. With this knowledge, strategies for the improvement of public discourses on future technologies can be developed.

    Gabi Waldhof (photo by Markus Scholz)
  • SESSION 2 – CHALLENGES AND CHANCES WITHIN THE SUGARBASED BASED BIOECONOMY

    Chairman: Prof. Dr. Ludger A. Wessjohann, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistr, GER

  • Keynote:Prof. Dr. Reges Heinrichs, São Paulo State University „Júlio de Mesquita Filho“ (UNESP), BRA

    Title: “Sugarcane management and fertilization system for the advancement of the bioeconomy in tropical regions”

    mehr

    Biography

    Prof. Dr. Reges Heinrichs, professor at Unesp, College of Agricultural and Technological Sciences, Dracena, Sao Paulo State, Brazil; He teaches in the undergraduate courses Agronomy and Animal Science and, furthermore, postgraduate program Animal Science and Technology. He holds a master's, doctorate and post-doctorate degree in the area of soil science and was a visiting researcher at the University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany and at the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Canada. The research area is about soil fertility management and fertilization system, working mainly on the following topics: plant nutrition, soil fertility, fertilizers, sugarcane and pastures.

    Abstract

    Currently, Brazil is the world's largest producer of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.), with approximately 9 million hectares and the average productivity of 72 t/ha. The sugarcane industry is responsible for the production of 30 billion liters of ethanol, 34 million tons of sugar and 11 million kw of energy from biomass, which represents 6.6% of the Brazilian energy. It is an agricultural crop of tropical regions, with great potential for expansion, especially for the generation of employment and income in places of greater need, leading to sustainability and quality of life for the population. However, it is necessary a soil environment and plant nutrition suitable for the cultivation. Research results about soil fertility management and fertilization systems will be presented, showing an increase in average productivity, which can reach three-digit indexes and the possibility of the crop reaching regions, still lacking in investment, but with the use of technologies , there is a great potential for production.

    Prof. Dr. Reges Heinrichs (photography: private)
  • Dr.-Ing. Joachim Venus, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy/ATB,

    Title: "Development of an advanced biorefinery concept using sugar-based feedstocks and residues"

    mehr

    Biography

    Dr. Joachim Venus, Senior Scientist “Industrial Biotechnology”, is program coordinator for the research program “Material and energetic use of biomass” and head of the research group bio-based products. His scientific focus is on the development of continuous processes for the production of basic chemicals - in particular lactic acid - from biogenic resources.

    Abstract

    Several types of renewable feedstocks are being used as raw materials for the biotechnological production of bio-based products. Lactic acid (LA) is one of the promising bulk chemicals, its salts and esters have a wide range of potential uses and are extensively used in diverse fields, e.g. bioplastics. The goal is to develop a fermentation process based on the substitution of expensive nutrient supplements by cheaper materials from biomass due to their main proportion of the whole process costs.

    According to the difficulties in the mobilization of fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic feedstocks a range of other, easy accessible substrates (such as residues from fruit and vegetable processing, by-products from starch and sugar factories or from the baking industry) are suitable for subsequent fermentation processes.

    The viability of the production of lactic acid from several feedstocks and residues has been demonstrated from laboratory up to pilot scale. As a result of the achievements so far the optimization of pre-treatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, and downstream processing steps   in parallel together with the screening of other LA producing bacteria have been performed.

    Dr. Joachim Venus (photography: private)
  • Lucia Atehortua, Ph.D., Universidad de Antioquia, COL

    Title: "Bioeconomy: An opportunity for the future Colombian development by way of its rich Biodiversity and Biomass"

    mehr

    Biography

    Lucia Atehortúa is a biologist from the University of Antioquia. Having earned her M.Ph. and Ph.D from the City University of New York (CUNY), she is currently a professor and researcher at the Institute of Biology in the Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences at the University of Antioquia. Since 2000, she has been the director of the Biotechnology Program at the University of Antioquia.  Her main areas of research have been related to biodiversity, economic botany, and biotechnology of microalgae, fungi and plants and more recently Bioeconomy and Biorefinery. Over the past two decades, Atehortúa’s activities have focused on biotechnology processes that ensure food and energy security and natural products commodities as an option for confronting and mitigating the effects of global climate change. Also, in the last past years, she has been involved in Bioeconomy and Biorefinery research.

    Her main achievements include several scientific articles, 10 patents, a brand or distinctive design. She has been selected as one of the innovators among the scientific community in the city of Medellin. Additionally, she has won various awards and received much recognition for her work and career in Natural Sciences and more recently, the National Science Agency of Colombia-Colciencias has named her as an Emeritus researcher of Colombia.

    Abstract

    Although Colombia is known for its great Biodiversity, this wealth has not been, and it is not integrated as an essential part of its development. However, the new paradigm of the Bioeconomy opens a new horizon for our country if through the tools offered by Biotechnology we manage to generate a dynamic of sustainable use of Biodiversity as a source of Biotechnology Innovation to generate new biobased industries. Traditionally, biodiversity has been used through extractive processes, sometimes exhausting biological resources that constitute a source of income, without considering the need for its preservation or sustainable use, leading to the nearest extinction of several species of economic importance. For this reason, it is necessary to address the development of Bioconomy from a real context of environmental sustainability and to achieve this we have developed processes and products through the tools offered by Biotechnology, generating alternatives for the present and the future of the humankind in order to guarantee the survival conservation of our species as well as the social and economic development for our future. Here, we will demonstrate how to  produce more with less with some of our processes and products that fulfil the Sustainable Bioeconomy without affecting the tropical environment and its biodiversity.

    Lucia Atehortúa (photography: private)
  • SUBSESSION 2 - Model Region Central Germany

    Chairman: Prof. Dr. Ludger A. Wessjohann, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistr, GER

  • Gerd Unkelbach, Fraunhofer Center for Chemical-Biotechnological Processes (CBP), GER

    Title: "(Di-)carboxylic acids by fermentation as building blocks for polymers, additives or food ingredients"

    mehr

    Biography 

    Gerd Unkelbach, born 1979 in Bonn, Germany, studied chemistry from 2000 to 2004 at the Bonn-Rhine-Sieg University of Applied Sciences. Since 2005 he was research assistant at the department Environmental Engineering and since 2008 leader of the reactions - and separation techniques group. 2010 he changed to the new Fraunhofer-Center for Chemical-Biotechnological processes CBP, whose leadership he has taken at the beginning of 2012. The CBP predominantly deals with the biotechnological and chemical synthesis of platform chemicals out of renewable resources.
    He is member of the Saxon Academy of Sciences, the Dechema and of the Board of Directors of the BioEconomy e.V..

    Abstract

    The increasing price of raw materials, the depletion of petroleum resources and the demand for a sustainable economy have led to a strong interest in sustainable raw materials and strategies for the production of specific materials, fine chemicals or bulk-chemicals. New conversion processes are required for the material use of renewable raw materials. Industrial (white) biotechnology processes play a key role in this. In combination with the established sugar industry as a producer of high-quality carbon sources for fermentation processes, a sugar-based bioeconomy can be developed.

    Using examples of process developments at Fraunhofer CBP for the fermentative production of (di)carboxylic acids, possible paths are pointed out and fields of application for the building block chemicals are demonstrated.

    Based on classical table sugar sucrose or glucose various biotechnological processes for the generation are known. For bulk products, however, these material flows are usually too expensive and generally too damaging due to the wide range of applications in the food sector. The aim is therefore to use streams of lower quality for the production of chemicals.

    As one example hurdles in the development and scale up of itaconic acid production from hydrolysates will be shown (results from a joint project within the high performance and transfer center Chemistry and Biosystems Technology). In addition to C6 sugar, C5 sugars like Xylose from plant hemicelluloses have high potential. Within the project “KomBiChemPro”, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the Project Management Jülich (PTJ) (reference 031B0083A), fermentation processes have been developed on the basis of these sugars.

     

  • Dr. Markus Lorenz, Südzucker AG, GER

    Title: "Sugar starches as unbeatable feedstocks for bioconomical purposes"

    mehr

    Biography

    Dr. Markus Lorenz is manager of the two plants in Brottewitz and Zeitz of the Südzucker AG. At the technical university Clausthal he studied and later archieved his doctoral degree with focus on thermal process engineering. Afterwards he worked three years in the field of plant construction in the chemistry industry. Since 1993 he has been working in the sugar industry, with 17 years of experience as manager of the sugar factory in Rheinland/Germany and 2 years as an employee in the department sugar production of the Südzucker AG. Since 2016, he manages the two plants Brottewitz and Zeitz. 

    Abstract

    Südzucker is a global German food company which founded its first sugar factory in Waghäusel in 1837. Sugar is still the core product and core business of the company, alongside additional sectors: special products, CropEnergies and fruit. Südzucker has a major presence in all these industries, and is a strong and sustainable economic factor in rural areas. Südzucker processes around 40 million tons of agricultural raw material in the form of beet, wheat, chicory, potatoes and rice. These raw materials are traditionally used to produce food or animal feed. In addition to the usable by-products for the feed industry, sucrose, starch, glucose, and fructose in particular, can also be extracted from the raw materials. Furthermore, carbohydrates from plants containing sugar and starch also form the basis for further processing into non-food products.Sugar and starch are considered “feedstocks” for the bioplastics of the future. Südzucker supplies the raw material portfolio for the various process routes, has the relevant technological expertise and operates in Zeitz a biorefinery (Verbundstandort) consisting of several factories (sugar factory, wheat starch plant, bioethanol plant and CO2-liquefaction plant).

    Dr. Markus Lorenz (photography: private)
  • DINNER EVENT - Dinner Speech: Dr. Sachse, leader of the service center economy, science and digitalisation of Halle (Saale)

    7.00 pm, Leopoldina, Jägerberg 1, 06108 Halle (Saale)

Tue May 14 th 2019

  • SESSION 3 - PLANT PRODUCTIVITY FOR A GROWING BIOECONOMY

    Chairman: Prof. Dr. Nicolaus von Wirén, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), GER

  • Keynote: Dr. Jurandir V. de Magalhaes, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa), BRA

    Title: "Crossing the "Valley of Death" Towards Sustainable Sorghum and Maize Production on Tropical Acid Soil Regions"

    mehr

    Biography

    Jurandir Magalhaes is a research scientist working since 2002 for the Maize and Sorghum Unit of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation – EMBRAPA, a government agency linked to the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply. He is also a Faculty member in the Genetics Department of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. Dr. Magalhaes received his Bachelor’s degree in Agronomy in 1990 and a Master´s degree in Soil Science and Plant Nutrition (1995), both at the Federal University of Viçosa in the State of Minas Gerais.  In 2002, he received his PhD degree in Field Crop Science with concentration in Plant Genetics and Plant Breeding at Cornell University (US). During 2015, Jurandir Magalhaes was a Visiting Scientist at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (US) working on the epigenomics of root system architecture and abiotic stress tolerance in crops. Jurandir´s research program is focused on the molecular and quantitative genetics of abiotic stress tolerance primarily in sorghum and maize and includes comparative genomics with other staple food crop species.

    Abstract

    The “Valley of Death” metaphor, which stresses a lingering gap between basic research and concrete applications in the marketplace, often limits the power of fundamental discoveries to increase agricultural sustainability in stress-prone environments. Widespread worldwide, acid soils are prevalent in tropical and sub-tropical regions where food security is still a challenge. Two important constraints for crop production in those areas are aluminum (Al) toxicity and phosphorus (P) deficiency due to P fixation into soil clays reducing availability. Al toxicity restricts root development into highly acidic sub-soil layers, enhancing the deleterious effects of drought stress on crop production. Our program seeks to identify the molecular determinants of sorghum adaptation to acid soils and, importantly, to deploy those into molecular breeding strategies. For example, a single allele of the Al-activated citrate transporter, SbMATE, has been recently shown to increase grain yield by ~0.5 ton ha-1 for sorghum lines and hybrids cultivated on an acid, Al toxic soil. SbMATE detoxifies Al by promoting the exclusion of its ionic forms from sensitive sites in the root apex, via formation of stable Al-citrate complexes. Using association mapping we developed gene-specific markers useful for high-throughput allele mining approaches in large germplasm sets, bridging gene discovery and pre-breeding. SbMATE is however prone to genetic background effects. Our recent advances in this area led to the identification of two transcription factors that are recognized by repeat variants in the SbMATE promoter, which are being deployed into our molecular breeding pipeline to maximize SbMATE expression and Al tolerance. We have recently shown that sorghum homologs of a serine/threonine receptor kinase, which was previously identified by other groups in rice, enhance phosphorus uptake and sorghum yield on a low-P soil. This is likely a result from enhanced root surface area favoring P diffusion and uptake, which is also being explored in maize transgenics. Our program on P efficiency includes a GWAS framework including multiple traits related to sorghum performance on low-P soils and root system architecture traits. In this talk, we will give an overview of our efforts towards the development of a molecular breeding pipeline to achieve overall sorghum adaptation to acid soils.

    Dr. Jurandir V. de Magalhaes (photography: private)
  • Dr. Fabio Fiorani, Forschungszentrum Jülich and Bioeconomy Science Center, GER

    Title:"Quantifying plant-environment interaction to optimise yield and quality"

    mehr

    Biography

    Fabio Fiorani studied Agricultural Sciences at the University of Milan, Italy and received his Ph.D in plant eco-physiology from the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands. He then continued his post-doctoral studies at Duke University, Durham NC, USA and at Plant Systems Biology, VIB, Ghent, Belgium thanks to a Marie Curie fellowship. After an experience in the biotechnology sector at BASF Plant Sciences, Cropdesign, Ghent, Belgium, he moved to Forschungszentrum Jülich, Plant Sciences, Germany, and became group leader of the Jülich Plant Phenotyping Center. He is currently principal investigator for national projects focusing on the development of novel plant phenotyping research infrastructure (German Plant Phenotyping Network – DPPN) and participated in international programs providing access to this infrastructure (European Plant Phenotyping Network – EPPN and EPPN2020). Throughout his career he focused on quantitative analyses of plant growth and resource allocation in response to growth-limiting abiotic factors and the development of non-invasive methodologies for application in plant physiology. In his keynote lecture he will provide an overview of platforms and methodologies for plant phenomics in controlled environment and field research that can be leveraged today to harness and characterize genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity to the environment. Plant phenotyping is embedded in the German national strategy for bioeconomy to support the use of plant biomass as a renewable resource, support plant breeding for resource use efficiency, and for the development of novel products plant-based value chains and processes.

    Abstract

    The aim of a sustainable and efficient bioeconomy will only be possible to be achieved, when integrated solutions are implemented that include technological innovation, sustainability integration as well as (socio-)economic aspects. The BioSC aligns research in its competence areas “plant production and resource stewardship”, “sustainable biomass conversion and engineering”, “molecular and microbial transformation” as well as “socio-economic solutions” between the Universities of Aachen, Bonn and Düsseldorf with Forschungszentrum Jülich´s bioeconomy research. The talk will present integrated projects and lessons-learned from 10 years of research towards integrated, sustainable bioeconomy.Integrated into the bioeconomy research, we coordinate national and European plant phenotyping project like the German Plant Phenotyping Network or the ESFRI-project EMPHASIS. Here we develop, implement, apply and provide access to unique infrastructures based on non-invasive technologies. The presentation will highlight the new opportunities that we generate in this field by combining plant sciences with state-of-the-art digitalisation approaches.

    Dr. Fabio Fiorani (photography: private)
  • Prof. Dr. Olman Quirós Madrigal, Universidad de Costa Rica, CRC

    Title: "research program for the sustainable economic development of the agri-food sector"

    mehr

    Biography

    Prof. Madrigals current position is Director Agricultural Economic and Agribusiness Research Center (CIEDA), Agri-Food Sciences Faculty. He is former Dean of the Faculty Agricultural and Food Sciences and Associate Professor School (Department) of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness of the University of Costa Rica. From January 2012 until July 2014, he worked as Director/ Professor School (Department) of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness. Besides, he performs as Lecturer in the School of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness on the topics Economic of farming systems and Economic Ecologogy in the Ph.D. Program in Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agri- Food Sciences, University of Costa Rica. Additionally he is a Consultant and trainer (course coordinator) on the methodology Rural Invest- RUTA/ FAO Central América as well as Guest lecturer in different universities in Latin America (Ecuador, Chile, Peru).

  • SUBSESSION 3 - Model Region Central Germany

    Chairman: Prof. Dr. Nicolaus von Wirén, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), GER

  • Dr. Götz Hensel, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), GER

    Title: "INDUCEPROT – Induced accumulation of recombinant proteins in plants"

    mehr

    Biography

    Goetz Hensel, molecular biologist, graduated from Technical University of Magdeburg in 1994. In 1996 I joined the Yeast Genetics group at the IPK Gatersleben as PhD student to work on the molecular characterisation of a tobacco protein CBP20 involved in plant-pathogen interactions and earned the doctoral degree from the University of Braunschweig. Later I joined within the same institute the Plant Reproductive Biology group as a Post-doc and was crucially involved in the improvement of methods of Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer to cereals and in a new principle of RNA-mediated downregulation of genes called host-induced gene silencing (HIGS). Meanwhile Lab manager and senior scientist I recently focused on customized endonuclease-mediated gene targeting (TALEN, CRISPR/Cas9), molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of pollen embryogenesis, the telomere-mediated truncation of chromosomes and genes involved in the spike architecture and domestication of barley. The data were published in more than 70 peer review papers as well as several book chapters. I’m a member of the European Plant Science Organisation (EPSO), the German Botanical Society, the Society for Plant Breeding e.V. (GPZ) as well as the management board of the German Society of Plant Biotechnology.

     

    Abstract

    The concept for the production of valuable proteins in plants is known as molecular farming. Beside transient expression using viral vector systems in tobacco leaves, the cereal grain is a natural bioreactor prone for storage of proteins at ambient conditions. Therefore the cereal grain provides a cost-effective, easily scalable expression system for the production of high-value proteins in the starchy endosperm. Proof of effective expression system for this particular compartment has been provided by the generation of a 2G12 antibody under the control of the oat Globulin1 promoter. In order to increase protein yield and to overcome the competition between endogenous storage protein accumulation and the high-value protein, an inducible depletion system for the endogenous barley storage protein class Hordeins will be established. We will combine two innovative technologies as targeted mutagenesis mediated by CRISPR RNA/Cas9 platform and induced inactivation using the N-end rule-mediated protein degradation pathway. So far mutants for the most abundant B-Hordeins has been generated and will be used for supertransformation with the conditionally stabilize/destabilize Hordein construct to establish a ‘driver’ line for the high-value protein accumulation.

    Dr. Götz Hensel (photography: private)
  • Prof. Dr. Alain Tissier, Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry, GER

    Title: "Using wild germplasm to reduce pesticide use in tomato"

    mehr

    Biography

    Professor Dr. Allain Tissier studies at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, France and gained his PhD in in Plant Biochemistry from the University of Orsay Paris-XI in 1993. After that, he continued as a postdoctoral fellow of the European Molecular Biology organization (EMBO) in the research group of Prof. Dr. Jonathan D.G. Jones, at the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK. From 1997 till 2003, he worked as a scientist at the Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique, in the Department of Plant Eco-Physiology, Cadarache, France before he became founder and CEO of Librophyt, a plant biotechnology start-up and in 2009 professor of Plant Biochemistry at the University of Montpellier.Currently, he is professor at the Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg and head of the department cell and metabolic biology at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry in Halle

    Abstract

    Several tomato wild species such as Solanum habrochaites are more resistant to herbivores and insect pests than their cultivated relative (S. lycopersicum). In many cases this stronger resistance was linked to secretions produced at the leaf surface by glandular trichomes. There are several types of glandular trichomes in tomato. Type VI produce terpenoids while type I/IV produce acyl sugars. Through a cooperative project with the World Vegetable Center in Taiwan, we are investigating the resistance to white flies (Bemisia tabacii) from a specific accession of S. habrochaites using selfed and back-cross populations from a cross with a cultivated tomato line. White flies are sap-sucking insects that are vectors of plant pathogenic viruses that lead to serious crop losses. Plants from the recombinant populations were scored for their resistance to white flies in no-choice assays. In parallel, we carried out metabolite profiling of leaves using LC- and GC-MS. Genotyping by sequencing allowed us to identify several QTLs contributing to white fly resistance. Some of these also coincide with QTLs for acyl sugars. Specific acyl sugars have been purified and will be tested for their biological activity against white flies. We are also evaluating a number of candidate genes localized in the QTL regions for their involvement in the biosynthesis of acyl sugars. Identification of the causal genes will assist breeders for the development of tomato varieties with increased resistance to white flies.

     

    Prof. Dr. Alain Tissier (photography: private)
  • Coffee Break

  • SESSION 4 - THE PATHWAY TO SUCCESS WITH BIOTECH PRODUCTS

    Chairman: Dr. Joachim Schulze, EW Biotech GmbH

  • Keynote: Daniel Dias, Solvay GmbH, BRA

    Title: "Learn and work exactly like a start-up"

    mehr

    Biography

    18 years professional experience, 12 years in Biotech and 6 years in business development start-up and new ventures. Graduated in Food Engineering and Business Management (MBA). He is currently Head of Biotech at Solvay GmbH and has gathered experience working with Amrys and Biomin do Brasil.

     

     

     

    Abstract

    Dias answers the questions, how I became Solvay member, what was and is Solvay and further describes the "Old Fashion Strategy". He explains what really did work on the renewable chemistry innovation strategy and what simply did not at all and concludes in lessons learnt. For changing the scenario, it is necessary to keep in mind the purpose, value propositions, new structure and outcomes. Challenges always occur.

    Daniel Dias (photography: private)
  • Dr. Alex Berg, Unidad de Desarrollo Tecnológico – Universidad de Concepción, CHL

    Title: "Adding value to pine bark"

    mehr

    Biography

    Dr. Berg realized postgraduate studies at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Afterwards he was in charge of the development of a new pulping and bleaching process with organic solvents, which was protected as Acetocell Process, and scaled up in South Germany.

    Since 1994, he occupies the position of Executive Director of the “Unidad de Desarrollo Tecnológico” in the University of Concepción, an entity whose main goal is to strengthen the joint work between Industry and University through the development of new products and technologies. He has been in charge of numerous R&D projects in the areas of bioenergy and biomaterials.

    He is author of numerous presentations in technical meetings, industrial patent applications and publications. Further, he is currentlyExecutive Director of the R&D Center “Unidad de Desarrollo Tecnológico”, University of Concepción, Chile.

    Abstract

    The main role of bark is to protect trees against adverse climatic conditions, insects and fungi, as well as the oxidation and degradation by oxygen and UV rays. In this context, trees have developed chemical compounds with specific activities and properties, as a defense mechanism.

    Our institute, Technology Development Unit of the Universidad de Concepción, is developing scientific and technological research to obtain and apply some of this components of Pinus radiata D. Don. Polycondensed catechins, also known as tannins, are of special interest, due to their high concentration and properties. We have developed a new bark extraction technology, which considers a two stage sequence of impregnation with steam/mechanical pressing instead of the traditional countercurrent solid-liquid extraction. This technology allows to process bark with low dilution factors and residence times. Along with the mentioned polyphenols, we are evaluating the feasibility of separating pectins and other hydrocolloid polysaccharides, and lipophilic compounds, such as waxes and phenolic acids.

    We are running a continuous productive plant that processes 200 kg of bark/hour with a tannin-yield of 10-15%. This stream is concentrated and, depending on the application, polysaccharides are precipitated with methanol and/or tannins are sulfited.

    We report various adhesive formulations that can replace urea formaldehyde (UF) in particleboards and MDF, and phenol formaldehyde (PF) in OSB and plywood. At the same time, we are conducting industrial trails on a tannin-based additive that, with 2% dosage, allows to reduce PF-adhesive consumption between 10 and 20%, without affecting the mechanical properties of plywood.

    Dr. Alex Berg (photography: private)
  • Dr. Marco Krämer, BluCon Biotech GmbH, GER

    Title: "2nd generation lactic acid - from invention to reality"

    mehr

    Biography

    Dr. Marco Krämer is microbiologist. Since October 2017, he is working as senior scientist and head of laboratory at the biotechnology company BluCon Biotech GmbH in Cologne in the field of strain and bioprocess improvement.  His main work is focused  on  research and development projects  for the fermentative production of polymer grade lactic acid from cellulosic and hemicellulosic residues  originating from agriculture and industry.  Lactic acid is the monomer of the biodegradable plastic, polylactide (polylactic acid, PLA).

    Before  joining  BluCon Biotech GmbH Dr. Krämer worked as scientist for  the biotechnology company Direvo Industrial Biotechnology GmbH in Cologne, at the Center of Marine Natural Products at GEOMAR in Kiel and at the biotechnology company DSM Biotech GmbH in Jülich. Dr. Krämer has written his doctoral thesis at the Institute of  Biotechnology I at the Research Centre Jülich and at the University of Düsseldorf.

    Abstract

    BluCon Biotech focusses on commercialization of a breakthrough technology to convert lignocellulosic feedstock to lactic acid by direct fermentation, using extremophilic anaerobic bacteria, without adding externally produced enzymes.  BluCon platform originates from Direvo, Köln.  The path from original invention, laboratory research and development through to the next stage, finding investors and continuing development with the objective of rapid commercialization will be presented.

    Dr. Marco Krämer (photography: private)
  • SUBSESSION 4 - Model Region Central Germany

  • Dr. Heike Sträuber, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), GER

    Title: "Beyond biogas - production of platform chemicals with anaerobic microbiomes"

    mehr

    Biography 

    Heike Sträuber is senior scientist at Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in the Department of Environmental Microbiology. Her work in the research group Microbiology of Anaerobic Systems (MicAS) focuses on gaining a deeper understanding of microbial relationships and activities in anaerobic bioprocesses. This aims at higher efficiencies of processes for the production of carboxylate platform chemicals or methane from biomass. Prior to this, Heike Sträuber worked as postdoc at UFZ and Saxon Institute for Applied Biotechnology (SIAB) on different projects with biotechnological focus. 

    Abstract

     

    In the biogas process, short-chain fatty acids such as acetate, propionate and n-butyrate are formed as metabolites. Increasing concentrations of these compounds indicate process failure (acidification). However, fatty acids can also intentionally be produced as platform chemicals by microbiome-based acidogenic fermentation. Short-chain fatty acids can be converted into the higher value medium-chain fatty acids, e.g. n-caproate and n-caprylate, by microbial chain elongation. In the CAPRAFERM process, methane production is inhibited while chain-elongating bacteria are supported to generate high product yields. Coupling this process to biogas production from fermentation residues enables a combined production of green chemicals and bioenergy. The added value of the chemicals can be used as an additional income for biogas plant operators. Thus, it opens new perspectives for German biogas plants running out of subsidies.

    Dr. Heike Sträuber (photography: private)
  • Dr. Andreas Petri,Miltitz Aromatics GmbH

    Title: "Resource-efficient production of fine chemicals"

    mehr

    Biography

    Dr. Petri studied Chemistry and obtained his Ph. D. in Organic Chemistry at the University of Tübingen in 2005. In 2007, he worked as a Postdocin Synthetic Organic Chemistry at Yale University, USA. Afterwards he held industrial positions in Saxony or Saxony-Anhalt (3 years at ChiroBlock GmbH, Wolfen and 3 years at c-LEcta GmBH, Leipzig). Since 2018 he is employed at Miltitz Aromatics GmbH, currently as Head of Research & Development. Research focus: Production of fine chemicals, including flavors & fragrances; isoprene and terpene chemistry; hydrogenations and heterogenous catalysis; development of resource-efficient processes.

    Abstract

    Resource-efficient production of fine chemicals“: A typical example for resource-efficient production of fine chemicals is the purification of 1,3-Butanediol out of a biotechnological production process. 1,3-Butanediol is used in large quantities as a fine chemical, e.g. in the cosmetic industry. The process presented here involves the biotechnological production of 1,3-Butanediol in aqueous media and its purification by vacuum distillation. The target compound could be obtained in high purity by a production process that is characterized by high atom economy and avoids the use of any organic solvents during Downstream Processing.

    Dr. Andreas Petri, Head of Research and Development of Miltitz Aromatics GmbH
  • Lunch Break

  • SESSION 5 - RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS FUNDED BY BMBF

    Chairwoman: Dr. Wiebke Müller, Projektträger Jülich, GER

  • BMBF project sessions:

     

    Prof. Traud Winkelmann, Leibniz Universität Hannover, GER

    Title: "ORDIAmur - Overcoming Apple Replant Disease by an Integrated Approach"

     

    Andreas Stäbler, Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging (IVV), GER

    Title: "An easy approach to gain tasty, cheap and functional sunflower protein meal"

     

    Dr.-Ing. Susanne Zibek, Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, GER

    Title: "How to produce chitosan from insects for textile applications"

     

    Dr. Ralf Kiese, Karlsruhe Institut for technology (KIT), GER

    Title: "Getting hot? Mountain grassland sustainability under climate change"

     

    Julian Thielmann, Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, GER

    Title: "Impregpack - Sustainable functionalization of packaging films by supercritical CO2"

     

    Dipl.-Ing. Hendrik Roch, Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology, GER

    Title: "Biodegradable multi-wall sheets for packaging applications"

     

    Dr. Sebastian Lippemeier, BlueBioTech GmbH, GER

    Title: "Probiotic effects of microalgae associated bacteria on fish larvae"

     

    Martin Bellof, Autodisplay Biotech GmbH, GER

    Title: "Making use of a waste by-product from palm oil production"

     

    Claudia Oehmke, University of Greifswald, GER

    Title: "From neglect to recognition: paludiculture as a necessity to achieve the Paris Agreement goals"

     

    Prof. Dr. Barbara Reinhold-Hurek, University of Bremen, GER

    Title: "Diverse catch crops as part of an integrated concept to stabilize or improve soil"

     

Diese Website verwendet Cookies sowie Analyse-Software zur Erfassung und Auswertung der Webseiten-Nutzung. Details zur Art und Umfang der Datenerhebung finden Sie in unserer Datenschutzerklärung. Zur ständigen Verbesserung unserer Website möchten wir Sie um Zustimmung zur Nutzung Ihrer Daten bitten.