Wed June 17 th 2020

  • OPENING

    Greetings

  • SESSION 1 - SOCIO-ECONOMIC ISSUES OF THE BIOECONOMY

    Prof. Dr. Alfons Balmann, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Development in Transition Economics, IAMO, GER

  • Keynote: Prof. Dr. Markku Wilenius, Finland Future Research Centre/FFRC, FIN

    Title: "The Wild Future of Bioeconomy"

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    Biography

    Coming soon...
     

    Abstract

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  • Dr. Martin Langer,BRAIN AG, GER

    Title: "Positive socio-economic impact from Bioeconomy. Two case studies from industry-led strategic alliances"

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    Biography

    Dr. Martin Langer joined BRAIN early 1995 where he was responsible for the GMP-process development and GLP-analytics for API. From 2000 he worked for a pharma biotech spin-off of BRAIN where he organized several VC-financing rounds. In 2005 he took over the BRAIN Corporate Development Unit and started t o grow the R&D business. 2012 he was appointed as an executive Vice President. In 2015 he headed the team that worked on the IPO early 2016. Since 2018 Martin is responsible for the BRAIN BU Industrial BioSolutions.

    Abstract

    coming soon...

    Dr. Martin Langer (Photo: Archiv BRAIN AG, Anja Jahn)
  • Asst. Prof. Dr. Sina Leipold, University of Freiburg, GER

    Titel: "Towards a circular Bioeconomy? Opinions from the Bioeconomy-Sector"

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    Biography

    Sina Leipold is an assistant professor at the University of Freiburg, Germany, where she heads a transdisciplinary research group that works on identifying policy and business strategies of a “circular bio-economy” that create positive environmental impacts and to understand whether and how decision makers are able to promote them. Her expertise includes policy analysis theories and methods (qualitative and quantitative), transnational business governance, and the circular economy.

    Abstract

    The European Union as well as Germany promote a ‘circular bioeconomy’. In the eyes of European and German policy makers, we will reach a circular bioeconomy through business innovation or the promotion of existing sustainable business models based on circular economy principles. Yet, we know next to nothing about how European businesses perceive or take up this strategy and whether it contributes to business innovation or the promotion of sustainable business models. To fill this gap, this paper analyses the bio-based sector’s view on the circular economy. It scrutinizes EU level debates as well as business practices in Germany. Based on a document analysis and participant observation data, the results show that business stakeholders currently relate the circular economy predominantly to established practices and to technological business models. This leaves considerable room for innovation in areas like social or organizational business models. Yet, the directions and effects of current activities remain uncertain. Connecting the debates about the circular economy and the bioeconomy could benefit the discussion of these possible directions and their effects. As our results show, exploring the relation between the circular economy and the bioeconomy highlights the need to define which cycles contribute most to a sustainable future economy. Existing guidelines and standards developed for businesses have been criticized for lacking exactly this definition. Hence, strengthening the link between circular economy and bioeconomy debates may provide a crucial step towards setting clear priorities for sustainable business practices.

     

    Asst. Prof. Dr. Sina Leipold (Photo: Körber)
  • Coffee Break

  • SUBSESSION 1 – Model Region Central Germany

  • Dr. Alberto Bezama, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), GER

    Title: "Adressing the Urban Bioeconomy through Life Cycle Management"

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    Biography

    Dr. Alberto Bezama is a Chemical Engineer from the University of Concepcion (Chile), with a PhD in Industrial Environmental Protection from the University of Leoben (Austria). Since 2012 he is a Researcher at the Dept. of Bioenergy at UFZ in Leipzig. There he leads the Working Group “Systems Analysis of the Bioeconomy.” Main focus of his research is the development and application of life cycle-based tools to assess the effects of implementing bio-based technologies in a regional perspective.

    Abstract

    Over the last years, a series of works at national and international levels have highlighted the relevance of the regional perspective on the successful implementation of the bioeconomy. As this is the scale where the actual effects of implementing the foreseen transition towards the bioeconomy, it is therefore the scale where these effects can be measured. However, nowadays there are not widespread tools that help measure and evaluate these effects.

    Life cycle management approaches could be used as basis for developing these tools. They provide a structure that allows to represent and model regional systems. In this regard, cities can be considered as the smallest representative entity where a regional approach can be developed and implemented.

    Therefore, this work provides an overview of the systems analysis of the bioeconomy on an urban scale. A first draft concept for the urban bioeconomy based on the traditional urban metabolism model will be presented and discussed, with the aim of introducing some questions and needs ahead to define the urban bioeconomy concept.

    It is expected that through this model it will be possible to identify and understand the transformation processes of bio-based resources on an urban level, as well as to understand the mechanisms underlying the interactions between different actors found at the city level in the bioeconomy field.

    Dr. Alberto Bezama (Photo: Private)
  • Kerstin Wilde, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), GER

    Title: "Bioeconomy discourses in regional development policy"

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    Biography

    Kerstin Wilde graduated in political economics at Hamburg University, Germany. In research, consulting and (executive) education she focused on entrepreneurship, innovation systems’ development and sustainable regional development. Kerstin contributed to the strengthening of industry-research interaction in ASEAN before she joined IAMO in 2016. Within the BMBF-funded TRAFOBIT Junior Research Group, she now takes an innovation system perspective for the analysis of European Bioeconomy clusters.

    Abstract

    Establishing a Bioeconomy in Europe has often been portrayed as new opportunity for regional development, which “can maintain and create economic growth and jobs in rural, coastal and industrial areas” (EC 2012, p. 8). Quite some support for actors comes from regional/provincial governments and development authorities – mostly via the promotion of specialised clusters: so?called bioclusters (Zechendorf 2011; Hermans 2018). However, the meaning of a bioeconomy is still ‘in flux’ and a matter of discourse among stakeholders (see e.g. Hüsing et al. 2017; Kleinschmit et al. 2017; Bauer 2018; Ramcilovic?Suominen & Pülzl 2018; Giurca 2020). Moreover, there are ambivalent research results regarding the relevance of place-based factors for successful bioeconomy development. It is also argued that (industrial) cluster policies are vulnerable to policy capture by vested interests (Nathan and Overman 2013; Njøs et al. 2017; Vivien et al. 2019). Against this background, we analyse dominant narratives on Bioeconomy visions and the role of bioclusters in regional development policies. An actor-focused perspective is applied to two transregional bioclusters in Germany and The Netherlands. Q-methodology serves to categorise different discourses into coherent storylines. The resulting policy perspectives on Bioeconomy promotion are interpreted against existing discourses of sustainable development (Dryzek, 1997; Hermans et al. 2009) and regional innovation strategies (Capello & Kroll 2016). Results highlight pronounced differences of the importance that is attributed by actors to the government, market forces and decisive place-based factors. Actor coalitions in and across science, incumbent firms and public services accentuate ‘sustainability light’ and ‘regional competitiveness’.

    Kerstin Wilde (Photo: IAMO)

Wed June 09 th 2021

  • Session 2 Lignocellulosic fiber within the bioeconomy

    Prof. Dr. Matthias Zscheile

  • Keynote:  Dr. Monica Normark, Sekab, SWE

    Title: “Advanced bioethanol production from softwood residues”

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    Biography

    Dr. Monica Normark, is the Head of the Biorefinery Technology within Sekab. The biorefinery technology platform CelluAPP® that can be licensed enables the fractionation of biomass into sugar, lignin and ethanol towards various green chemicals, bio-based materials and advanced biofuels. Dr. Normark is a chemical engineer and holds a PhD in chemistry, focusing on pretreatment and bioconversion of lignocellulosic materials. Applying her engineering background and deep understanding of chemical processes she can lead this technology forward targeting forestry residues among other biomasses for a green fossil free transition. Dr. Normark lives in Sweden and is proud to be part of the ongoing transition to a fossil-free society.

    Abstract

    In Örnsköldsvik, in the midst of the northern forests, close to the Baltic Sea, lies the cradle of the Swedish chemical industry. This is where Sekab has its roots. Sekab is a Swedish Chemical and Clean-Tech Company Group. We process ethanol into Chemicals and Biofuels, we develop Biorefinery Technology for new sustainable product options based on lignocellulose raw materials. SEKAB has extensive experience, of manufacturing, processing and marketing of ethanol and basic chemicals for the chemical industry. The company has developed certain know-how, patents, processes and proprietary technologies for the production of fermentable sugars, lignin and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass, which can be licensed for commercial scale production. The processes and technologies are commercialized through the technology platform called CelluAPP®. The unique features applying Sekab’s patents regarding pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic material will contribute to a green transition and help reducing the carbon footprint for both industrial biofuel and chemical production.

    Dr. Monica Normark (Photo: Sekab)
  • Caterina Coll Lozano, IMECAL S.A.,SPA

    Title: "Urban Biorefineries: Integrated innovative biorefineries for the transformation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) into new BioBased and Bioenergy products"

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    Biography

    Caterina Coll Lozano has professional experience of over 20 years in process engineering and environment, mainly developed in CEAM (“Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterraneo”) as Head of laboratory and environmental projects, and in IMECAL as Plant Manager of second generation bioethanol pilot plant PERSEO, COO and R&D Manager. Over the last years she has coordinated and participated in several projects at national and international level and performed scientific and technical publications in various journals, books and conference contributions. Coordinator of EU projects URBIOFIN, PERCAL and Waste2Bio among others.

    Abstract

    Several types of renewable feedstocks are being used as raw materials for the biotechnological production of bio-based products. Lactic acid (LA) is one of the promising bulk chemicals, its salts and esters have a wide range of potential uses and are extensively used in diverse fields, e.g. bioplastics. The goal is to develop a fermentation process based on the substitution of expensive nutrient supplements by cheaper materials from biomass due to their main proportion of the whole process costs.

    According to the difficulties in the mobilization of fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic feedstocks a range of other, easy accessible substrates (such as residues from fruit and vegetable processing, by-products from starch and sugar factories or from the baking industry) are suitable for subsequent fermentation processes.

    The viability of the production of lactic acid from several feedstocks and residues has been demonstrated from laboratory up to pilot scale. As a result of the achievements so far the optimization of pre-treatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, and downstream processing steps   in parallel together with the screening of other LA producing bacteria have been performed.

    Caterina Coll Lozano (Photo: Private)
  • Prof. Dr. Jan-Peter Mund, Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development, GER

    Title: "Beyond biomass – lessons learned from sustainable forest-based bioeconomy development from the taiga to the tropics"

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    Biography

    Jan-Peter Mund (Prof. Dr. rer. nat) holds a full professorship for GIS and Remote Sensing at the Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development in Germany. Since 2010 he serves also as a senior advisor to the UN-Water Programme at the United Nations University in Bonn and to several EU-research programmes. He is a member of the Arbormaps scientific advisory board and provides scientific consultancies for several international organisations. Additionally he is a regular guest lecturer at TU Munich and for Remote Sensing, GIS and Disaster Management.

    He studied Physical Geography, Landscape Ecology and Geo-Informatics at the Universities of Bonn and Mainz, Germany. He holds a Ph.D. in physical geography and a German Diploma on Geography and Landscape Ecology with key competences in Remote Sensing, GIS and tropical soil science. He gains more than 15 years of international experience in academic work and international cooperation, capacity building and applied remote sensing in Africa, Middle East and South East Asia.

    Abstract

    The EU and over 50 countries globally have developed Bioeconomy strategies to transform into economies based on renewable natural resources used in a sustainable manner in line with the requirements of SGD 4, 7, 12 and 15. It is evident that increasing demand for wood material and timber-based products, especially low-value wood resources like sawmilling residues, is only positive if forest ecosystems are managed sustainably. However, visions about the relationship between the bioeconomy and sustainable development differ substantially among various global regions and segments of society.

    At the same time, Higher Education Institutions continuously face the challenge of producing fit-for-job graduates in response to evolving global job markets. Highly skilled personnel are the prerequisite for innovative research, growth and secure employment in multidisciplinary sectors such as the bioeconomy. To address the gap between international study programs currently available and the knowledge and skills needed to drive the emerging bioeconomy sector, six universities from four countries cooperated to develop an international, innovative and multi-disciplinary master’s curriculum on sustainable forest-based bioeconomy. The consortium includes EU universities from Finland, Germany and Spain, and three universities from Vietnam. All universities share a common emphasis on sustainable environmental and forest sciences yet bring unique technical expertise, perspectives towards local markets and stakeholder networks within the bioeconomy sector. The result is a new master’s curriculum which includes multiple disciplines, values and perspectives and involves various stakeholders to facilitate the development of a sustainable forest-based bioeconomy.

    Prof. Dr. Jan-Peter Mund (Photo: Private)
  • SUBSESSION 2 - In The Model Region Central Germany

    Prof. Dr. Matthias Zscheile, BioEconomy e.V., GER

  • Dr. Martin Zahel, Papiertechnische Stiftung/PTS, GER

    Title: "The role of modified cellulosic fibers in future material development"

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    Biography 

    Martin received an MSc in Chemistry in 2011. During his PhD studies (2011-2015) in Organic Chemistry at Technical University of Dresden he developed synthetic routes to several bioactive sesquiterpenes with anti-tumor activity. Since 2014 Martin is employed at Papiertechnische Stiftung (PTS) in Heidenau, Germany. Starting as a project manager in the field of advanced chemical modification of pulp fibres and polysaccharidic materials he became Head of Department Composites & Modification in March 2017. His research focus is on the development of novel cellulose based materials and the corresponding process technology.

    Abstract

    Within the last years product development focuses more and more on sustainability in the sense of a circular and bio-based economy. Main tasks are the use of renewable feedstocks, ensuring recyclability, enabling cascade use and providing biodegradability in case of non-closed product cycles. This is most important particularly for short-term use applications such as packaging. Paper has been a sustainable material for this field for over a century. However the increasing customer demands cause different requirements on the usage and processing properties of future paper materials, especially when competing with other packaging materials such as plastics or metals.

    This talk will focus on pathways for enhancing the material immanent properties of cellulosic fibres via chemical and mechanical modification and will show what may be possible with paper based materials in a sustainable future. Intriguing features that are unknown from today's paper such as thermoplasticity, high barrier or highest strength will be accessible utilizing the right modification strategy. Thereby the arc is stretched from the generation of new structures to suitable processing methods. Furthermore the role of modified fibres in non-paper materials such as biocomposite materials will be discussed.

    Dr. Martin Zahel (Photo: Private)
  • N.N.

     

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    Biography

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    Abstract

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  • DINNER EVENT - Dr. Judith Marquardt

    7 o'clock p.m., Leopoldina, Jägerberg 1, 06108 Halle (Saale)

  • Session 3 Plant Productivity under climate change

    Prof. Dr. Nicolaus von Wirén, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research/IPK, GER

  • Keynote: Prof. Dr. Alan Schulmann, University of Helsinki, FIN

    Title: "Plant Responses and Adaptation to Changing Enviroments"

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    Biography

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    Abstract

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  • Dr. Miriam Szurman-Zubrzycka, University of Slesia, POL

    Title:"HorTILLUS - TILLING population tp create barley better adopted to climate change"

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    Biography

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    Abstract

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  • Dr. Ralf Wilhelm, Julius Kühn-Institute/JKI, GER

    Title: "A CRISPierR future in the EU?"

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    Biography

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    Abstract

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  • SUBSESSION 3 - Model Region Central Germany

  • Markus Meier, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), GER

    Title: "Optimization of the Shoot-to-Root Ratio for improved plant performances"

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    Biography

    Markus Meier studied Plant Biotechnology at the University of Hannover (LUH) with the main focus on plant nutrition, molecular biology and protein biochemistry (2006 - 2012). His PhD study focused on “Ammonium-dependent changes in lateral root branching” (Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Group: Molecular Plant Nutrition, IPK Gaterleben, Germany (2012 - 2018)). Since 2018, he investigates tillering-dependent changes in root morphology in wheat.

     

    Abstract

    The growth of plants under challenging environmental conditions needs an efficient and tightly regulated developmental of the shoot and root to react to nutrient and water deficiencies.

    The aim of the project “Rootshape” is to investigate the influence of tillering on the development of roots in wheat. In this regard, it is important to clarify, to what extent the competition for assimilates between newly formed tillers and roots determine the processes involved in tillering and rooting. The number of tillers and roots as well as the length of the root system are crucial factors for plant performance under changing environmental conditions. A final goal is the generation of wheat lines with an optimal shoot-to-root ratio to further increase yield. To achieve this goal, wheat lines with different tillering potential were selected and used for the production of DH populations consisting of wheat lines with a large phenotypic variation in tiller number. Those wheat lines should be characterized by a root system perfectly adjusted to the shoot morphology, that allows an optimal supply of the yield determining organs with water and nutrients to increase the yield potential and the yield stability in wheat. It seems that the shoot-to-root ratio is a dynamic trait, which is influenced by the environment and partially facilitated by the developmental process of tiller reduction occurring especially under challenging growth conditions like heat and drought. Tiller reduction, also known as tiller abortion, reduces the number of tillers competing for assimilates and water and optimizes the shoot-to-root ratio towards a comparable larger root system, allowing optimized resource utilization.

    For the selection of wheat lines with the ability to balance their shoot-to-root ratio according to the environmental challenges, molecular markers and physiological markers need to be developed to allow a fast and successful breeding procedure.

    Markus Meier (Photo: Private)
  • Prof. Dr. Marcel Quint, Martin Luther University/MLU, GER

    Title: "Global warming effects on plant growth and development"

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    Biography

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    Abstract

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  • Coffee Break

  • SESSION 4 - THE PATHWAY TO SUCCESS WITH BIOTECH PRODUCTS

    Prof. Dr. Markus Pietzsch, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg/MLU, GER

  • SUBSESSION 4 - Model Region Central Germany

  • Dr. Ales Bulc, Global Bioenergies GmbH, GER

    Title: "GBE to make your old VW Golf clean again"

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    Biography 

    Dipl-Ing. Dr. Ales Bulc is a Director of Global Bioenergies GmbH and the Project manager for the Leuna demonstration plant. He is leading the advanced biofuels/jetfuels development within GBE. Dr. Bulc combines the technical expertise with construction of first-of-a-kind plants and commercialization of R&D results. Dr. Bulc worked as EPC contractor delivering technology solutions as well as investor ordering them. For over 20 years he is bridging the gap between R&D and commercial world. Dr. Bulc is a Fulbright scholar.

    Abstract

    Slowly, we are recognizing that there is a limited budget of allowed CO2 emissions if we ever want to comply with the Paris accord. Therefore, we must act fast and resolutely. Advanced biofuels offer a way to reduce emissions of the existing fleet of cars, i.e. to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions in transportation.

    Global Bioenergies (GBE) has developed a process to ferment industrial sugars into isobutene to produce fully renewable ETBE, MTBE, isooctane and other fuel additives and octane boosters. In 2018 GBE has tested a 35% renewable and EN228 compliant gasoline blend in a regular car on a race track at Montlhéry, France and is presently working on a fuel blends approaching 100% renewable gasoline that could be used in all gasoline powered vehicles on our roads.

    Mandating the use of advanced biofuels can rapidly decrease the CO2  and particle emissions. Fossil based ETBE and MTBE are mixed into almost all gasoline purchased at the pump today to improve the gasoline quality. Fully renewable ETBE/MTBE can also be used to reduce CO2 emissions by blending up to 20% of fully renewable octane booster in all gasoline sold today. By taking this drop in advanced biofuels approach to reduce the emissions we are entering the existing market for the large scale introduction of advanced biofuels; technology exists to implement it on a fast track approach; it has economic benefits as emission reduction is materialized on millions of existing as well as new cars sold today.

    Advanced biofuels reduce CO2 emissions by up to 70% on an LCA approach. In addition, several single cylinder test have been performed where up to 40% reduction of particle emissions have been observed. Therefore, advanced biofuels are a clear path forward to reduce vehicle emissions in the next few years with a minimal regulatory push.

    GBE is preparing the construction of the first commercial plant for the production of fully renewable isobutene to be converted for the use in cosmetics industry to take advantage of limited market at higher price as well as advanced biofuels with its huge existing market.

    Dr. Ales Bulc (Photo: Private)
  • Dr. Bodo Moritz,Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg/MLU, GER

    Title: "Ferulic acid synthesis in engineered Bl21 – Balancing recombinant expression to cell vitality"

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    Biography

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    Abstract

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  • Lunch Break

  • SESSION 5 - RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS FUNDED BY BMBF

    Dr. Wiebke Müller (Project Management Jülich)

  • BMBF project sessions:

     

    Dr. Arren Bar-Even, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, GER

    Title: "Increasing agricultural yield through formate production and assimilation"

     

    Dr. Astrid Gärdes, Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research/ZMT, GER

    Title: "Diversity of microorganisms in both natural and aquaculture tropical seaweed systems: biotechnology potential for sustainable development"

     

    Dr. Hans Jürgen Hahn and Dr. Susanne van den Berg-Stein, University of Koblenz Landau, GER

    Title: "StygoTracing, a new biotracer technique for hydrological interactions and risk assessment in drinking water supply"

     

    Dr. Annette Piorr, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research/ ZALF, GER

    Title: "A VITAL approach to sustainable intensification: stakeholder participation, farmers’ behaviour and scenarios"

     

    Dr. Anett Werner, Technical University of Dresden, GER

    Title: "Xenokat - can fungal enzymes cleave xenobiotics?"

     

    Dr.-Ing. Volker Herdegen, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, GER

    Title: "Bagasse and rice straw - sources for a multi-purpose material use"

     

    Dr. Maria Proestou, Humboldt University of Berlin, GER

    Title: "Institutional Implications of Bioeconomy Development in Germany"

     

    Dr. Martin Banse, Thünen Institute, GER

    Title: "Towards a socially accepted bio-based economy - Results of the BEPASO project"

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